Tuesday, October 29, 2013

our new porch

 Sunday morning, we woke up to a sciff of snow. Luckily, today graced us with warm temperatures and melted what snow remained.
view of the house, garden and garage from up near the barn facing north
Last year, it was decided, that this spring, one of the projects that we were going to do, was to replace the old rotten deck. We need a porch/mudroom. 

We were hoping that in April, that the deck could be removed and the new construction could begin. Mother nature had other ideas. It was closer to the end of April before the demolishing began.

As you can see, there was still quite a bit of snow on the ground. 


Hubby had used his chainsaw, and cut the deck in about three or four spots. With each section that he cut away, he used the tractor, and hauled it to 'our dump.' He has since used parts of the deck for other uses.


He had to be careful removing the old header because of the gas line.









Earlier today, hubby installed the sub-floor.


And tomorrow, I am hoping the door that we bought gets hung.
 Back in June, our truck decided to have a break down, and that ate our porch budget.
 I was hoping, that we would have had it done by now.


 Bit by bit we will get our porch completed






the best ever salsa sauce

I have been busy not only with my regular farm chores, but putting up my tomatoes that I grew this year. The end is very near. Thank goodness!!


I am starting to feel tomaoted (is that even a word?) out!


My gang eats a lot of salsa sauce.


Besides eating it with taco type chips...


there are tacos and baked potatoes.


What all do you eat salsa sauce with or on?


SALSA SAUCE

6 lbs of prepared tomatos
10 jalapeno peppers or a variety of hot peppers
3-4 large onion
6 green peppers
3 red peppers
8 crushed garlic clove
3 small canned tomato paste
3 tbsp olive oil
3 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp seasoning salt

-put washed tomatos through the food processor, process it to the 'chunkiness' you prefer-measure out 6 lbs of processed tomatos
-if you prefer more of a bite to your salsa, leave most of the seeds in your hot peppers
-put your veggies through the food processor, keeping in mind to keep all the 'chunks' uniform and consistency of your processed tomatos
-put all of the ingredients into a pot, bring to a boil
-fill your sterilsed jars, leaving one inch headspace, process in a water bath for about 10 minutes
-makes about 12 pint jars


Note: I have to say this, so please forgive me: The canning method I use is what I have been doing for years and believe to work best for my family. I am not in anyway against pressure canning nor do I feel my method is any less safe than that of pressure canning. Please use the method you feel safest with as I am not responsible for any mishaps or illnesses.

Sunday, October 27, 2013

inside and outside


 My fridge was starting to fill up with quart jars with cream, so I managed finally to get some butter made.


This 'wolf' looking canine is Hawkeye. He is a Malamute, Husky cross with German Shepherd. He belongs to daughter #3. Hawkeye is 10/11 months old. He is sulking by my bees, because I gave him heck with a very stern voice. Why? Because I was trying to round my geese, and he started chasing them. Which is a no-no! 


My geese.



I tried to get a new photo of the new calf, but Hawkeye ran up to the fence and startled him.  



I sold my small flock of sheep earlier this spring, but the folks that purchased my flock didn't want my ram. Lawerence finally found a new home. 



Daughter #3 has purchased another horse. Equinox- Q for short-is a four month old Drum horse. 


And I am still working on getting all my tomatoes done up


Friday, October 25, 2013

some of our critters

Mackie
From left to right: Miss Dolly, Annie and her calf.

Hawkeye

Puss. He was my supervisor today as I got the geese grain.

Goatie. I know. Originial.
Henry. The heifer in the background eating is Tess.

canned pizza sauce




I love putting up my garden. 


I even love my kitchen tools that help me put up my garden faster-like my food mill!


I run the tomatoe skins etc again through my food mill for a second time, just to get all the good bits from them.



When I go to use my pizza sauce, I add fresh herbs and a pinch of dried hot peppers or a dash of a hot sauce, just to give it a bit of zip.






PIZZA SAUCE

13 cups prepared tomatos
1/2 cup bottled lemon juice
2 tsp dried oregano leaves
1 tsp ground pepper
1 tsp table salt
1 tsp garlic powder

Pass tomatos through a sieve or food mill, measure 13 cups. (If you do not have a food mill or strainer, blanch, peel, core and chop tomatos. Place in colander and let stand 15 minutes; discard liquid and puree tomatoes in a food processor. Measure 13 cups)

Place half of the tomato puree in a large stainless steel saucepan; bring to a boil. Maintaining a constant boil, add remaining tomato puree 1 cup at a time. Stir in lemon juice, oregano, pepper, salt, and garlic powder. Boil hard, stirring frequently, about 15 minutes or until desired consistency is reached.

Ladle sauce into a hot jar to withing 1/2 inch of top rim (headspace). Using nonmetallic utensil, remove air bubbles. Wipe jar rim removing any stickiness. Centre lid on jar; apply screw band securely until fingertip tight. Do not over-tighten, Place jar in canner. Repeat for remaining sauce.

Fill canner full of water, and cover with the lid; return water to a boil. At altitudes up 1, 000 feet process 35 minutes. (Check your local area for altitudes and adjust processing time)  Remove jars without tilting. Cool upright, undisturbed on a cloth towel for 24 hours. DO NOT RE-TIGHTEN screw bands. Check jars seals. Label and store in a cool, dark place. Do not stack your jars.

Makes about 4 pint jars.

Adapted from Bernardin

Note: I have to say this, so please forgive me: The canning method I use is what I have been doing for years and believe to work best for my family. I am not in anyway against pressure canning nor do I feel my method is any less safe than that of pressure canning. Please use the method you feel safest with as I am not responsible for any mishaps or illnesses.


Thursday, October 24, 2013

my inherited geese

At the end of July, my husband's dad passed away, at home while he was watching tv. 


Long story short, I ended up with the geese. Which is fine. I did come home with eight, but somehow one wounded it's leg, and the coyotes had a meal. We put the geese into our 'dugout paddock'. The dugout is our water source for the house and the automatic waterers. 


The chickens were also out in the dugout paddock. Hubby cut the fence so the chickens could come and go out of their chicken coop. I managed to round up the geese into the coop yard, which wasn't easy when Hawkeye scattered them on me.


This is my patch job.


The geese were none to happy that they were finally locked up.


 They all were checking the fence line, looking for an escape route.


In the distance is our dugout.



Almost every goose checked out my patched job.






Our dugout. 


pink sky


 The sunrise at 8.30 am today.

view to the barn south-easterly

north-easterly with part of the horse paddock in the photo

looking east over the horse paddock



I LOVE the colours that make up a sunrise and the sunset!