Thursday, November 07, 2013

fixing fences

On this property that we purchased, the previous owners were big fans of electrical fences. Both hubby and I HATE them!. We find them more work than what they are worth. You need to make sure there is no grass or trees touching the tensile wire. If the  electrical fencer quits working, you have miles of fencing that needs to be checked. Time consuming.
The fences around here have not been maintained in years.   

In our opinion, electrical fences are only good for temporary fencing. For example, seasonal pastures or to prevent a horse from chewing on your wood plank fences and to protect the shelter belt tress from said horse who likes chewing on them.

But with that all said, we don't have an endless bank account-which is our secret desire to have one-we can't afford to be changing all the existing fences over to barb wire. So we need to maintain them instead. With every new fence we put in, we are putting in barb wire.


Along the East side of the U field, which runs along the county road, a moose did some damage when it went through the electric fence. Normally we wouldn't really worry about having a good fence that is bordering a hay field. But we graze our hay fields to extend our grazing season. Since we had cows in the U field, we needed to fix the fence. 
I am not up to par on my lingo when it comes to the parts of a electric fence. Hubby calls this a tension-er. I don't even know if it is a word!! I just know the two ends of the wire gets looped in there,  to take up the slack on the high tensile wire, you than wind it around that black round thing. 


Hubby had to nail a few of these insulators back on to the posts. 



This white one is also another type of insulator- a corner post insulator. Here, hubby was re-connecting the hot wires back onto the wires that he wanted electricity running through.


The essential fence repair kit.


Can't really tell in this photo, but the grass is trampled down by the post.


Earlier this fall, I seen a bear cross the road to get into the oat field. The bears had quite the game trail made crawling under the fence to get at the oats that were growing.

2 comments:

  1. Every day is a new adventure. I never thought about people's fencing before. Though I have seen many horse farms and thought, "wow, that's a lot of fence." I never thought of the upkeep, really.

    Always love hearing about your day.

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  2. For us, we like barb wire. The experts say initially barb wire costs more. But hubby says he doesn't believe they factor in the costs for all of the insulators, the electric fencer or the maintenance of the fence lines. Even solar electric fences are expensive.

    The livestock don't do much damage to the fences. Our repairs are the result of wildlife going through the fences or old and decaying fence posts.

    In the farm yard, most of our fences are plank. Now those are costly!! But the plank fences sure do make a yard pretty!!

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